Hand Injury Lawyer in Milwaukee, Wisconsin

Hand Injury Attorney Milwaukee, Wisconsin – The Hand is an incredibly complex combination of the following:hand-injury-attorney

  • Bones – the Hand contains nearly 20 separate bones
  • Joints – the connection between two bones – each Hand contains 27 Joints
  • Ligaments – the tough bands connecting bones with one another
  • Tendons – the soft-tissues connecting muscles to bones
  • Muscles
  • Blook Vessels

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The large number of bones, joints, ligaments, tendons and muscles within the Hand, all in a very concentrated area, make the Hand very susceptible to injury from trauma. Hand Injuries comprise up to 10% of emergency department visits each year.


Milwaukee, Wisconsin Hand Injury Attorney

Bones of the Hand

The bones of the Hand are all susceptible to Bruising and Fracture from trauma. The trauma is usually direct trauma, such as blunt trauma during a Car Accident or Falling on the hand.

The Hand is made up of 19 separate bones.

hand-bonesPhalanges – the bones of the fingers, with the distal phalanx being the finger tip, the proximal phalanx being closest to palm or metacarpals, and the middle phalanx connecting the two

Metacarpals – the bones of the hand under the palm, connecting the Carpal Bones to the Phalanges

The following bones are also in the area of the Hand but not technically in the Hand itself:

Carpals – the bones of the Wrist

Ulna – one of the two bones of the Forearm

Radius – the other bone of the Forearm

Types of Hand, Thumb and Finger Fractures

All Hand, Thumb and Finger Fractures are either Complete Hand, Thumb or Finger Fractures or Incomplete Hand, Thumb or Finger Fractures . A Complete Hand, Thumb or Finger Fracture means that a bone of the Hand, Thumb or Finger is cracked all of the way through the bone. An Incomplete Hand, Thumb or Finger Fracture means the crack of the bone does not go all of the way through the bone.

A Comminuted Hand, Thumb or Finger Fracture is one in which the bone has broken into a number of different pieces.

The common medical terminology for Hand, Thumb and Finger Fractures is as follows:

  • Metacarpal Fracture – a fracture of the bone connecting the wrist (Carpals) to the fingers or thumb (Phalanges) – Metacarpal Fractures are classified from the thumb (1st Metacarpal) to the pinky finger (5th Metacarpal)
  • Proximal Phalanx Fracture – a fracture of the finger or thumb bone closest to the metacarpals – Proximal Phalanx Fractures are classified from the thumb (1st Phalanx) to the pinky finger (5th Phalanx)
  • Middle Phalanx Fracture – – a fracture of the finger bone which connects the Proximal Phalanx to the tip of the finger – Middle Phalanx Fractures are classified from the index finger (2nd Phalanx) to the pinky finger (5th Phalanx) – Note: the thumb (1st Phalanx) does not have a middle phalanx bone
  • Distal Phalanx Fracture – – a fracture of the finger bone which connects the Proximal Phalanx to the tip of the finger – Distal Phalanx Fractures are classified from the thumb (1st Phalanx) to the pinky finger (5th Phalanx)

Treatment for a Broken Hand, Thumb or Finger

Uncomplicated Hand, Thumb or Finger Fractures can be treated by Reduction (putting the bone back in place), Casting (putting a cast over the Hand, Thumb or Finger). Surgery is often necessary to repair more serious Hand, Thumb or Finger Fractures, oftentimes, utilizing metal plates and screws during surgery to increase stabilization to the Broken Hand, Thumb or Finger. An Open Reduction with Internal Fixation means the site of the injury is opened by a surgeon, who then puts the bone back in place, removes any identifiable bone fragments and installs a metal plate and screws to repair the Hand, Thumb or Finger Fracture.

Prognosis for a Broken Hand, Thumb or Finger

The severity and type of the Hand, Thumb or Finger Fracture will determine the ultimate prognosis. Hand, Thumb or Finger Fractures commonly result in some type of permanent impairment to the broken bone, oftentimes with accompanying pain, limitation in range of motion and functional loss.

Hand, Thumb or Finger Dislocation Injury

hand-jointHand, Thumb or Finger Dislocation Injuries are common types of Hand Injuries. A Hand, Thumb or Finger Dislocation injury is an injury to the joint between two bones of the Hand, Thumb or Finger. The hand contains dozens of joints depicted in red to the right and described below:

  • Interphalangeal Joint – the joint between the Proximal Phalanx and Middle Phalanx or the joint between the Middle Phalanx and the Distal Phalanx
  • Metacarpalphalangeal Joint – the joint between the Metacarpals and the fingers (Phalanges)
  • Carpometacarpal Joint – the joint between the Carpals and the Metacarpals

Hand, Thumb or Finger Dislocations are often accompanied by a Fracture to at least one of the bones Hand, Thumb or Finger.

Treatment of Hand, Thumb or Finger Dislocations

The proper course of treatment following Hand, Thumb or Finger Dislocation is typically Reduction, which is the process of forcing the bones back into proper alignment. Reduction can be extremely painful and requires a significant amount of force. Once the bones of the Hand, Thumb or Finger is back in proper alignment, X-rays are taken to determine the extent of any associated Hand, Thumb or Finger Fractures. The Hand, Thumb or Finger is then typically casted and the injury victim is required to return in a few days for follow-up X-rays. Hand, Thumb or Finger Dislocations may or may not result in permanent Hand, Thumb or Finger joint instability, loss of range of motion, weakness and ongoing pain.

Hand, Thumb or Finger Muscle, Tendon and Ligament Injuries

The Hand contains a complex network of ligaments, tendons, joints, muscles, arteries, veins, nerves and blood vessels all working together. Trauma to the Hand can disrupt the proper movement of the Hand.

The following are common soft-tissue injuries to the Hand:

  • Sprain – a stretch or tear to the Hand, Thumb or Finger ligaments (fibers connecting one bone to another bone)
  • Strain – a stretch or tear to the Hand, Thumb or Finger tendons (fibers connecting the muscles to the bones)
  • Rupture – a complete tear of an Hand, Thumb or Finger ligament or Hand, Thumb or Finger tendon

Hand, Thumb or Finger Sprains and Hand, Thumb or Finger Strains are classified in order of severity as follows:

  • Grade I Hand, Thumb or Finger Sprain or Hand, Thumb or Finger Strain
  • Grade II Hand, Thumb or Finger Sprain or
  • Grade III Hand, Thumb or Finger Sprain or Hand, Thumb or Finger Strain

It is important to keep in mind that Sprains and Strains are stretches or tears of the Hand, Thumb or Finger Ligaments, Hand, Thumb or Finger Tendons or Hand, Thumb or Finger Muscles. While many Hand, Thumb or Finger Sprains and Hand, Thumb or Finger Strains do heal with time, they may not heal completely. Although the damage may be microscopic and may not visible on current imaging techniques such as MRI, this does not mean that Hand, Thumb or Finger Sprains and Hand, Thumb or Finger Strains may not result in serious and severe pain and permanent impairment.

Treatment of Hand, Thumb or Finger Tendon, Ligament and Muscle Injuries

The treatment of Hand, Thumb or Finger Injuries is largely dependent on the specific injury sustained. The different types of treatment can include the following:

  • Immobilization
  • Physical Therapy
  • Massage Therapy
  • Ultrasound
  • Corticosteriod Injections
  • Pain Medication and Muscle Relaxants
  • Surgery

Contact an Experienced Wisconsin Hand, Thumb or Finger Injury Attorney

Each year innocent victims suffer Wisconsin Hand, Thumb or Finger Injuries as a result of the carelessness of another. It is critical that Hand, Thumb or Finger Injury victims have an attorney that understands Hand, Thumb or Finger Injuries and the potential ongoing problems that can result from Hand, Thumb or Finger Fractures, Hand, Thumb or Finger Dislocations, Hand, Thumb or Finger Tendon Injuries and Hand, Thumb or Finger Ligament Injuries.

If you or a loved one has sustained an Hand, Thumb or Finger Injury due to the negligence of another, be sure to contact an experienced Wisconsin Hand, Thumb or Finger Injury Attorney.